Sharing Archaeology

Sharing. Archaeology. An. Obligation,. Not. a. Choice. Peter. G. Stone. That we should, and do, share the results of our archaeological work seems an obvious statement to make and thus, to some minds, might bring into question why this ...

Sharing Archaeology

As a discipline, Archaeology has developed rapidly over the last half-century. The increase in so-called ‘public archaeology,’ with its wide range of television programming, community projects, newspaper articles, and enhanced site-based interpretation has taken archaeology from a closed academic discipline of interest to a tiny minority to a topic of increasing interest to the general public. This book explores how archaeologists share information – with specialists from other disciplines working within archaeology, other archaeologists, and a range of non-specialist groups. It emphasises that to adequately address contemporary levels of interest in their subject, archaeologists must work alongside and trust experts with an array of different skills and specializations. Drawing on case studies from eleven countries, Sharing Archaeology explores a wide range of issues raised as the result of archaeologists’ communication both within and outside the discipline. Examining best practice with wider implications and uses beyond the specified case studies, the chapters in this book raise questions as well as answers, provoking a critical evaluation of how best to interact with varied audiences and enhance sharing of archaeology.

More Books:

Sharing Archaeology
Language: en
Pages: 282
Authors: Peter Stone, Zhao Hui
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-08-13 - Publisher: Routledge

As a discipline, Archaeology has developed rapidly over the last half-century. The increase in so-called ‘public archaeology,’ with its wide range of television programming, community projects, newspaper articles, and enhanced site-based interpretation has taken archaeology from a closed academic discipline of interest to a tiny minority to a topic of
Finding Solutions for Protecting and Sharing Archaeological Heritage Resources
Language: en
Pages: 154
Authors: Anne P. Underhill, Lucy C. Salazar
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-10-23 - Publisher: Springer

This volume provides case studies about successful strategies employed in diverse world areas for the protection of archaeological heritage resources. Some chapters focus on a search for solutions arrived at by diverse groups of people working in specific areas rather than simply describing loss of cultural heritage. Other chapters provide
Material Cultures in Public Engagement
Language: en
Pages: 168
Authors: Anastasia Christophilopoulou
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-08-31 - Publisher: Oxbow Books

The Material Cultures in Public Engagement volume seeks to document and explore the significant change in the relationship of Museums with collections of the Ancient World and their audiences. The volume establishes a new approach to the study of public archaeology as a discipline and application within Museums, by bringing
Public Archaeology: Arts of Engagement
Language: en
Pages: 290
Authors: Howard Williams, Caroline Pudney, Afnan Ezzeldin
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-21 - Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

This collection, stemming from the 2nd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference 'Archaeo-Engage: Engaging Communities in Archaeology' (April 2017), provides original perspectives on public archaeology’s current practices and future potentials focusing on art/archaeological media, strategies and subjects.
Community Archaeology and Heritage in Africa
Language: en
Pages: 310
Authors: Peter R. Schmidt, Innocent Pikirayi
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-06-17 - Publisher: Routledge

This volume provides new insights into the distinctive contributions that community archaeology and heritage make to the decolonization of archaeological practice. Using innovative approaches, the contributors explore important initiatives which have protected and revitalized local heritage, initiatives that involved archaeologists as co-producers rather than leaders. These case studies underline the