Renaissance Hybrids

List of Illustrations Introduction: Renaissance Hybrids: Culture and Genre in 4 5 Early Modern England 1 Towards a Renaissance Theory of Hybridity 2 Giant Aspirations: Cultural Archaeology in Spenser's 1590 Faerie Queene 3 The View from ...

Renaissance Hybrids

In the first book-length study explicitly to connect the postcolonial trope of hybridity to Renaissance literature, Gary Schmidt examines how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English authors, artists, explorers and statesmen exercised a concerted effort to frame questions of cultural and artistic heterogeneity. This book is unique in its exploration of how 'hybrid' literary genres emerge at particular historical moments as vehicles for negotiating other kinds of hybridity, including but not limited to cultural and political hybridity. In particular, Schmidt addresses three distinct manifestations of 'hybridity' in English literature and iconography during this period. The first category comprises literal hybrid creatures such as satyrs, centaurs, giants, and changelings; the second is cultural hybrids reflecting the mixed status of the nation; and the third is generic hybrids such as the Shakespearean 'problem play,' the volatile verse satires of Nashe, Hall and Marston, and the tragicomedies of Beaumont and Fletcher. In Renaissance Hybrids, Schmidt demonstrates 'postmodern' considerations not to be unique to our own critical milieu. Rather, they can fruitfully elucidate cultural and literary developments in the English Renaissance, forging a valuable link in the history of ideas and practices, and revealing a new dimension in the relation of early modern studies to the concerns of the present.

More Books:

Renaissance Hybrids
Language: en
Pages: 254
Authors: Gary A. Schmidt
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-08 - Publisher: Routledge

In the first book-length study explicitly to connect the postcolonial trope of hybridity to Renaissance literature, Gary Schmidt examines how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English authors, artists, explorers and statesmen exercised a concerted effort to frame questions of cultural and artistic heterogeneity. This book is unique in its exploration of how
Reconceiving the Renaissance
Language: en
Pages: 436
Authors: Ewan Fernie
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-03-31 - Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

The last two decades have transformed the field of Renaissance studies, and Reconceiving the Renaissance: A Critical Reader maps this difficult terrain. Attending to the breadth of fresh approaches, the volume offers a theoretical overview of current thinking about the period.Collecting in one volume the classic and cutting-edge statements which
A Boccaccian Renaissance
Language: en
Pages: 340
Authors: Martin Eisner, David Lummus
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-06-25 - Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

A Boccaccian Renaissance brings together essays written by internationally recognized scholars in diverse national traditions to respond to the largely unaddressed question of Boccaccio’s impact on early modern literature and culture in Italy and Europe. Martin Eisner and David Lummus co-edit the first comprehensive examination in English of Boccaccio’s impact
The Cambridge History of the English Language
Language: en
Pages: 796
Authors: Richard M. Hogg, Norman Francis Blake, Roger Lass, R. W. Burchfield
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This volume spans Middle English, Early Modern English and the early stages of modern language.
Hybrid Renaissance
Language: en
Pages: 284
Authors: Peter Burke
Categories: Architecture
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-16 - Publisher: Central European University Press

Hybrid Renaissance introduces the idea that the Renaissance in Italy, elsewhere in Europe, and in the world beyond Europe is an example of cultural hybridization. The two key concepts used in this book are ?hybridization? and ?Renaissance?. Roughly speaking, hybridity refers to something new that emerges from the combination of