Feminisms and Critical Pedagogy

First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Feminisms and Critical Pedagogy

First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

More Books:

Feminisms and Critical Pedagogy
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Carmen Luke, Jennifer Gore
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-02-04 - Publisher: Routledge

First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Critical Feminism and Critical Education
Language: en
Pages: 152
Authors: Jennifer Gale De Saxe
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-03-31 - Publisher: Routledge

Challenging the current state of public education and teacher preparation, this book argues for a re-imagination of teacher education through a critical feminist and critical education perspective. Offering a rich discussion of the promise and pedagogy of self-reflexivity and testimonio, which emerges from critical feminism, this book brings together theory
The Struggle For Pedagogies
Language: en
Pages: 208
Authors: Jennifer Gore
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-02-01 - Publisher: Routledge

First Published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Muslim Women, Transnational Feminism and the Ethics of Pedagogy
Language: en
Pages: 316
Authors: Lisa K. Taylor, Jasmin Zine
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-06-27 - Publisher: Routledge

Following a long historical legacy, Muslim women’s lives continue to be represented and circulate widely as a vehicle of intercultural understanding within a context of the "war on terror." Following Edward Said’s thesis that these cultural forms reflect and participate in the power plays of empire, this volume examines the
Critical Pedagogy and Social Change
Language: en
Pages: 193
Authors: Seehwa Cho
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: Routledge

At its core, the main goal of critical pedagogy is deceptively simple—to construct schools and education as agents of change. While noble and ambitious, it is not always realistic in a climate of increased commodification, privatization of schooling, and canned curriculum. By assuming rather than articulating its own possibilities, critical