Family Support Programs and Rehabilitation

The prevention offamily distress aboutTBI symptoms, the maintenance of emotional adjustment, thereduced reliance onhealth services, and thehigh consumer satisfaction ratings byrelatives inthefamily support programlendstrong support to ...

Family Support Programs and Rehabilitation

The permanent effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are not limited to the person who suffers the injury. People who care for the individual, particularly family members, suffer in various ways. Family members are often confused as to the behavioral and neuropsychological changes that they see in a brain-injured rela tive. They can become frustrated and angry when the individual does not return to premorbid levels of functioning. They can become tired and worn down from repeated problems in trying to manage the individual's difficulties while having only fragmented information regarding them. Drs. Smith and Godfrey have provided a useful service for family members by summarizing important neuropsychological changes associated with TBI and providing practical guidelines for coping with these problems. While the neuropsychological problems they describe are not completely understood, the authors provide a useful description of many of the neuro behavioral problems seen following TBI in young adults. They attempt to provide guidelines for family members that have practical utility in understanding and managing these patients. Theirs is a cognitive-behavioral approach that can have utility for this group of individuals. I applaud their efforts to provide something systematic and practical for family members.

More Books:

Family Support Programs and Rehabilitation
Language: en
Pages: 222
Authors: Louise Margaret Smith, Hamish P. D. Godfrey
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-06-29 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

The permanent effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are not limited to the person who suffers the injury. People who care for the individual, particularly family members, suffer in various ways. Family members are often confused as to the behavioral and neuropsychological changes that they see in a brain-injured rela
Family Assistance Act of 1970
Language: en
Pages: 253
Authors: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Rules
Categories: Public welfare
Type: BOOK - Published: 1970 - Publisher:

Books about Family Assistance Act of 1970
Delivering Health Care in America
Language: en
Pages: 649
Authors: Leiyu Shi
Categories: Medical care
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

Books about Delivering Health Care in America
Characteristics of State Plans for Aid to Families with Dependent Children Under the Social Security Act, Title IV-A, and for Guam, Puerto Rico, & Virgin Islands
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Leiyu Shi
Categories: Aid to families with dependent children programs
Type: BOOK - Published: 1984 - Publisher:

Books about Characteristics of State Plans for Aid to Families with Dependent Children Under the Social Security Act, Title IV-A, and for Guam, Puerto Rico, & Virgin Islands
Psychotherapy for Families after Brain Injury
Language: en
Pages: 492
Authors: Pamela S. Klonoff
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-04-18 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business

Whether caused by illness, accident, or incident, brain injury requires multi-tiered resources for the patient and considerable external care and support. When recovery is sidelined by depression, anger, grief, or turmoil, family members and the support network have critical roles to play and need their own guidance and compassionate therapeutic